Speeding up time

Last year I took out a subscription to Netflix. I can usually find enough to watch for a month but then not enough to keep the subscription going for any longer. For Christmas 2020 I reactivated the subscription, again probably just for a month.

So far I have watched and can recommend:

  • The Fear Of 13 – astonishing documentary about a man on death row
  • American Murder: The Family Next Door – fascinating documentary using social media content, text messages and police video footage
  • 22 July – brutal but honest dramatization of the massacre of 77 Norwegian teens
  • The Crown (series 4) – hilarious fabrication of the life of our royal family. The Duke of Edinburgh is my favourite!
  • The Queen’s Gambit (series) – very enjoyable tale about a young, female chess genius

With Netflix you can choose what speed to watch a film at. I’ve found it’s perfectly watchable to view at 1.25 times the normal speed and even at 1.5 times.

Watching at a faster speed means less time spent / wasted / indulged (a 60 minute episode only lasts 40 minutes at 1.5 times normal speed, whilst a 90 minute film only lasts an hour)!

Try it and save time!


The Young Montalbano

BBC4 are repeating The Young Montalbano and what a glorious treat it is.

A great story (Mortally Wounded) was pure joy. There’s so much to be gained from being familiar with the main characters, their quirks, their repetitive behaviour. It’s quality drama with complex and rich, crime stories. It’s funny, it’s farce, and it’s charming and brilliant. The acting is wonderful, the characters are warm and the actors are beautiful.

An acquired taste, for sure, but when you get it, you’re in for a treat.

Machines – an astonishing documentary

This astonishing documentary about life in an Indian textile factory is available once again on the BBC iPlayer, but only until Tuesday (now expired): https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b09g8cc9/machines
At the very least, these workers deserve 65 minutes of your time.

Capture“A mesmerising and unflinching look behind the doors of a textile factory in India, as director Rahul Jain observes the life of the workers and the oppressive environment they seldom escape from. Machines tells a story of the human cost of mass production in a globalised world, showing the gulf between rich and poor from both perspectives.”