A visit to the library

The libraries are open again and there are the necessary Covid precautions – masks, a one-way system and an ID registration. I must have been there three-quarters of an hour yet I was the only visitor. After several circuits of the shelves I was almost resigned to coming away with nothing but then a flurry of possibly interesting reads appeared. In addition, the library was disposing of copies of Matt Haig’s Midnight Library, leftovers from World Book Day. Well thank you very much, I’ll have one!

I think I’m an e-book convert

The bookshops are closed, the libraries are closed, and there are only a few books waiting to be read, so I thought I’d try downloading an e-book for viewing on the iPad.

I found an app called Libby, which links to my local library account, and decided to start with George Orwell’s Keep the Aspidistra Flying, a book I last read 50 years ago!

The app works really well, both for finding e-books and for the actual reading. My old iPad is rather heavy but I worked out how best to hold it for a comfortable reading position. It was surprisingly easy to read the e-book, in fact I think the larger text and fewer words on each page improved my reading concentration. Or perhaps I was just enjoying the novel so much.

So a successful trial, at no cost, and when I’ve finished my current paperback novel I’ll look out for another e-book from the library.

Glass plate prints at the library

It’s not often I visit the main library but I’m glad I did as I came across a lovely, small exhibition of glass plate portrait prints. There’s a web site about the larger collection and a full set of images can be found on a Flickr site. It’s a fascinating collection that was discovered in the basement of a shop seventy years after the plates were abandoned by the photographer David Knights-Whittome.